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Thursday, February 7, 2013

Since Obama Decrees Drones Can Kill Americans, Here's How Americans Can Kill Drones

 Since Barack Obama recently took it upon himself to label himself 'dictator' with free will to kill Americans with drones, isn't it time that Americans learn how to fight back and kill drones? 

This excellent article informs Americans who are completely disgusted with the 'Police State' our once free nation has become on how to kill UAV's. If UAV's are going to be used to kill Americans, Americans need to learn how to fight back. 

Our GOD given right to defend our own lives is a much higher power than either Barack Obama or the 2nd Amendment of the US Constitution or the US Pentagon and their killing machines. These monsters DESERVE to be grounded. Here's how to do it!


The UAVs have two alternative systems for communication.
Line of sight radio :
In the military C-Band  500 - 1000 MHz that can be jammed with simple spark-gap radio
Satellite communication :
In the Ku-Band between 10.95 - 14.5 GHz, and  the satellite can be jammed.
The Uplink-Band to the satellite is 13.75 - 14.5 GHz
The Downlink-Band from the satellite is 10.95 - 12.75 GHz
And you should jam the Uplink frequencies with a jammer directed at the satellite.

uavcom.jpg (29230 bytes)

uavparab.jpg (39257 bytes)
parab.jpg (8240 bytes)
The satellite link system is from L-3 Communications.
Specifications.pdf

Surprisingly, the resistance can tap off the military's video feeds
As you can see in the specifications, the satellite link system uses the same civilian commercial technology as television broadcasting companies. And the surprise is that the resistance and others have tapped off the videos from the battlefield with simple commercial equipment.

But now the communication is perhaps encrypted. Read more about SkyGrabber.pdf

If you jam the communication, then the operator becomes blind and the UAV will fly around until it crashes or the fuel is gone. But you must kill both links of communication to kill any rescue.

There are a limited number of satellite channels available which means that the satellite link becomes a bottleneck. The satellite is therefore used as a backup and jammer-rescue channel and for single special operations from far away from the target, while C-band radio is used for multiple simultaneous operations from near the targets. Every military base have their own UAVs that must be operated through the C-band radio. C-band radio is also reported to be used for take off and landing. Which means that the C-band radio is your primary target. The C-band radio is also easier to jam.

First some clips from the web

Lack of protected satellite communications could mean defeat for joint force in future war.
Defense experts have repeatedly warned that the availability of space-based communications could be compromised in future conflicts by the fact that 80-90% of all military traffic is transmitted on vulnerable commercial satcom channels. However, there is a related problem that far fewer military observers have noticed: only about 1% of defense communications today are protected against even the most modest jamming threats.

http://www.abc.net.au/science/news/space/SpaceRepublish_120537.htm
According to the US Air Force, information from the internet is being used to sabotage satellite signals critical to military operations.

This week's New Scientist reports that instructions on how to build satellite jammers, using cheap equipment from home improvement stores and electronics fairs, are to be found on the internet.

The US Air Force team, dubbed the Space Aggressor Squadron, was set up to look for weak spots in satellite communications and navigation systems by playing the part of a potential enemy.

"We ran a search on the Net and found there's quite a lot of information out there on how to build and operate satellites but also, unfortunately, on how to jam them," says Tim Marceau, head of the squadron. "Just type in 'satellite communications jamming' and  you'll be surprised how many hits you get." 

Two rookie engineers from the US Air Force Research Laboratory were ordered to build a jamming system using only a Net connection and whatever they could buy for cash. 

For $7500, the engineers lashed together a mobile ultrahigh-frequency (UHF) high-power noise source that they could use to jam satellite antennas or military UHF receivers. "It's just like turning your radio up louder than someone else's," Marceau says. 

The engineers built their home-made jammer using a petrol-driven electricity generator, wood, plastic piping and copper tubing. The amplification and noise-generation electronics were obtained at an electronics enthusiasts "swap meet". 

"For very little money and very little sophistication, we found you could muck up communications," says Marceau. Different components could be used to jam other frequencies, such as that of the Global Positioning System.

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2005/09/23/us_deploys_sat_jamming_squads/
The US has created electronic-warfare squads capable of jamming enemy satellite transmissions. Fearful of losing its advantage of superior technology resources over its potential enemies

Due to the low received signal strength of satellite transmissions they are prone to jamming by land-based transmitters. Such jamming is limited to the geographical area within the transmitter's range. GPS satellites are potential targets for jamming, but satellite phone and television signals have also been subjected to jamming. It is trivial to transmit a carrier to a geostationary satellite and thus interfere with any other users of the transponder. It is common on commercial satellite space for earth stations to transmit at the wrong time or on the wrong frequency and dual illuminate the transponder rendering the frequency unusable. Satellite operators now have sophisticated monitoring that enables them to pin point the source of any carrier and manage the transponder space effectively.

http://www.wnd.com/?pageId=118345
The U.S. Army is moving forward with a plan to order thousands of radio-frequency-jammer devices to foil improvised explosive devices, even though terrorists' latest attacks in the Afghanistan war have used mechanical, rather than radio, detonators, according to a report from Joseph Farah's G2 Bulletin.

The jammers likely will cause problems with remotely operated aerial drones, . . .
According to experts, U.S. troops experienced jamming in Iraq in 2006 when the Warlock RF jamming system had a detrimental effect on their communications systems and UAVs.

Warlock radio frequency jammers in use in Iraq interfere with Army radio communications and block controls needed to operate unmanned aerial vehicles, according to a study of the service's initial effort to transform divisions into “modular” brigades... Read more>> How to kill UAV