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Wednesday, July 31, 2013

The U.S. Military Has Awarded Contracts To Al-Qaeda In Afghanistan

Submitted by Michael Krieger via Liberty Blitzkrieg blog,

I suppose it just wasn't enough that our allies, "the rebels" in Syria, have significant Al-Qaeda elements to them. No, we are the USA! USA! Best country ever. Defender of human rights. City on a hill. We must do far more than that. So we did.

This story below from Bloomberg, highlights a 236-page report by the U.S. Army Suspension and Debarment Office, which shows that military contracts have been granted to the Taliban and Al-Qaeda in Afghanistan. Yep, this is exactly what happens when an empire gets too big, too corrupt, and ends up in the hands of a bunch of sociopaths. From Bloomberg:
Supporters of the Taliban and al-Qaeda in Afghanistan have been getting U.S. military contracts, and American officials are citing "due process rights" as a reason not to cancel the agreements, according to an independent agency monitoring spending.

"I am deeply troubled that the U.S. military can pursue, attack, and even kill terrorists and their supporters, but that some in the U.S. government believe we cannot prevent these same people from receiving a government contract," Sopko said.

The 236-page report and Sopko's summary provide one of the watchdog agency's most critical appraisals of U.S. performance in helping to build a stable Afghanistan as the Pentagon prepares to withdraw combat troops by the end of next year.

The U.S. has 60,000 troops in Afghanistan, with plans to reduce the number to 34,000 by February. President Barack Obama hasn't decided how many to keep in the country after 2014 to train Afghan forces and engage in anti-terrorist missions.
"Anti-terrorist missions." Like what, rewarding them lucrative contracts?
An audit showed that after 16 months, none of the agency's essential program objectives have been reached and the money spent has mostly financed workshops and training sessions. The project is aimed at bolstering Afghanistan's government before troop withdrawals planned for next year.
 "It's troubling that after 16 months, this program has not issued its first community grant," Sopko said. "Rather, it has spent almost $50 million, about a quarter of the total program budget, on conferences, overhead and workshops."
 Regarding the 43 cases of contractors with militant connections, Sopko said the Army should "enforce the rule of common sense" in its suspension and debarment program.

 "They may be enemies of the United States but that is not enough to keep them from getting government contracts," according to the agency's report.
Someone's definitely lining their pockets... and it's not just the "terrorists."
Full article here.