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Saturday, November 23, 2013

Secession Movement Growing In Two Surprising States

Posted by Kristin Tate
November 23, 2013
Source Benswann

The “secession movement” is currently picking up steam in two unlikely states: Colorado and Maryland. Groups of residents in both states cite leftist agendas and high taxes as reasons for wanting to become independent.

On Friday night, a group called Western Maryland: A New State Initiative met to discuss the secession of Western Maryland. They say their mission is “to form a new state comprised of Maryland’s five western counties.”

The Washington Times reported, “People are feeling ‘the pinch’ of overbearing state regulations from the largely Democratic majority in Maryland. Western Maryland is a more conservative segment of the state, and their views are well reflected in their website which points to gun control regulations and high taxes as the primary grievances of the citizenry.”

Western Maryland’s five counties, Allegany, Carroll, Frederick, Garrett, and Washington, only make up 11 percent of the state.

Some Colorado residents are also interested in seceding. Conservative citizens dislike the anti-gun legislation that plagues the state — some are also concerned by the fact that marijuana and gay marriage is legal.

After rural Colorado voters approved the secession idea, Democratic Gov. John Hickenlooper said, “We understand that some rural areas still feel underrepresented and are not being heard. We remain committed to listening more and working with local communities all across Colorado.”

Perk Odell, an 80-year-old and lifelong resident of rural Colorado, voted to secede. He said, “We can’t outvote the metropolitan areas anymore, and the rural areas don’t have a voice anymore.”

If these citizens in rural Colorado were successful in seceding, their new state would be about the size of Vermont.

It is unlikely that either Maryland or Colorado’s secession movements will be successful — in order to do this, the state legislatures would have to approve it and Congress would need to recognize the new, independent states. However, this growing movement does demonstrates a significant polarization of ideologies in America.